Objectives

Upon completion of this module, students will be able to:

  1. Identify reasons why laws and regulations are important in the business community.
  2. Define “law”
  3. Identify the sources of law in the United States
  4. Differentiate between civil law and criminal law
  5. Describe the role of the judiciary in the United States
  6. Outline the structure of the federal and Kentucky Court systems
  7. Describe the sequence of events that take place in a criminal and civil trial.
  8. Identify selected personal and business crimes and the defenses to those crimes. 
Introduction

Greetings to the scholars who want to learn about Business Law. My name is Bruce W. Singleton. I received my law degree in 1977 from the University of Kentucky, and I have spent the last 39 years practicing law in Somerset, Kentucky. I have taught legal subjects off and on since 1979, and now work for Campbellsville University as a teacher of Business Law and Cyberlaw. It is my goal that you will learn about the foundation of the system that you already think you know a lot about. You have already watched a lot of television and movies, after all, so you know a lot. Right? Surprisingly, you do, in fact know a lot, so the process shouldn’t be a shock to your system. We will begin with business and the rules which govern it, proceed through the process of enforcing civil and criminal rights in the American system, and end with the fundamentals of contract law. I will use the Kentucky court system throughout much of the course in the paradigm materials for a number of very good reasons. The best one is that this is where I have practiced law so long, and thus can speak as an authority on the issues you will be studying. The second is nearly as important: the federal and state systems are essentially very similar, and most, if not all of the legal dealings you will ever have as a person involved in business will be in the state courts. Kentucky is one of 50, and the principles you learn about this system will translate to any of the other 49. I do not intend to make this a course which prepares you for law school. I intend to make this course that makes you aware of the potential perils out there in the legal world when you are practicing business.

I suggest you follow the materials in the order in which I have presented them. The links to internet resources are designed to be entertaining and thought-provoking.

I welcome your comments on any of the materials, lectures, or the courseware in general.

Enjoy the journey!

Last modified: Tuesday, January 3, 2017, 12:26 PM